45 RPM Vinyl Record

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  • In stock

    The Doors – The Soft Parade

    88,00 

    Includes 19% MwSt DE
    Additional costs (e.g. for customs or taxes) may occur when shipping to non-EU countries.

    "...I thought it was impossible to improve on Bruce Botnick's neutral and detailed engineering on the original Elektra vinyl, but Chad Kassem's 45 RPM, 180-gram reissue, stamped on two discs by his own Quality Record Pressings, has more inner detail, deeper bass, more extended highs, wider dynamic range and more delicacy. Over the last 20 years, many record companies have claimed, largely erroneously, that their "audiophile" vinyl reissues of classic jazz, rock and classical music exceed the sound quality of the original LPs. Here, Chad Kassem has actually done it, and by a wide margin." — Robert J. Reina, Stereophile, February 2014. A 2014 Stereophile Record to Die For! "...This double 45 is so far superior sounding to the red label original and Japanese late '70s reissue I have here ... easily the greatest version of it for those who are fans. I have never heard so much detail revealed and such blackness behind the notes, nor have the strings and horns been so well reproduced. The laminated gatefold packaging is a treasure you'll want to polish when your grimy fingerprints dull the luster."  Music = 8/11; Sound = 10/11 — Michael Fremer, Analog Planet.com. To read Fremer's full review, click here: http://www.analogplanet.com/content/soft-parade-too-soft About Soft ParadeRolling Stone described two songs written by guitarist Robby Krieger, “Touch Me” and “Follow Me Down” as horn-string showpieces for the resonant baritone of Jim Morrison. Described as among the cleanest, most solid and, above all, most recognizable sounds in rock, the distinctive Doors’ sound was no doubt due to the Morrison power, but the other Doors were equally responsible. Ray Manzarek brought virtuosic keyboard tapestries, Krieger gritty, expressive fretwork, and Densmore dynamically rich percussion grooves. Half of the songs on Soft Parade, The Doors’ fourth LP, were written by Morrison and the other half by guitarist Krieger. “Touch Me” became one of The Doors’ most popular singles. Released as a single in December 1968, the song reached No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 1 in the Cashbox Top 100 in early 1969. It was the band’s third American No. 1 single. Analogue Productions and Quality Record Pressings are proud to announce that six studio LP titles — The Doors, Strange DaysWaiting For The SunSoft ParadeMorrison Hotel and L.A. Woman —  are featured on 180-gram vinyl, pressed at 45 rpm. All six are also available on Multichannel SACD! All were cut from the original analog masters by Doug Sax, with the exception of The Doors, which was made from the best analog tape copy. "Throughout the record history of the Doors, the goal between Paul Rothchild and myself was to be invisible, as the Doors were the songwriters and performers. Our duty was to capture them in the recorded medium without bringing attention to ourselves. Of course, the Doors were very successful, and Paul and I did receive some acclaim, which we did appreciate. "If you listen to all the Doors albums, no attempt was made to create sounds that weren't generated by the Doors, except for the Moog Synthesizer on Strange Days, although that was played live in the mix by Jim, but that's another story. The equipment used was very basic, mostly tube consoles and microphones. Telefunken U47, Sony C37A, Shure 56. The echo used was from real acoustic echo chambers and EMT plate reverb units. In those days, we didn't have plug-ins or anything beyond an analogue eight-track machine. All the studios that we used, except for Elektra West, had three Altec Lansing 604E loudspeakers, as that was the standard in the industry, three-track. On EKS-74007, The Doors, we used four-track Ampex recorders and on the subsequent albums, 3M 56 eight-tracks. Dolby noise reduction units were used on two albums, Waiting For The Sun and The Soft Parade. Everything was analogue, digital was just a word. We didn't use fuzz tone or other units like that but created the sounds organically, i.e. the massive dual guitar solo on "When The Music's Over," which was created by feeding the output of one microphone preamp into another and adjusting the level to create the distortion. The tubes were glowing and lit up the control room. "When mastering for the 45-RPM vinyl release, we were successfully able to bake the original master tapes and play them to cut the lacquer masters." - Bruce Botnick, July 2012 "I received test pressings today for both Morrison Hotel and L.A. Woman. I have to tell you that these are the very best pressings I've heard in many, many moons. Great plating and your compound is so quiet that I clearly heard every fade out to its conclusion with no problem. Doug (Sax) and company did a lovely job, the tapes sound pretty damn good for being almost 50 years old and his system is clearly the best...You should be very proud of what you and your troops are doing." - Bruce Botnick, The Doors producer/engineer Click here to read a 1997 interview in The Tracking Angle with Doors producer/engineer Bruce Botnick.

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    The Doors – Waiting For The Sun

    88,00 

    Includes 19% MwSt DE
    Additional costs (e.g. for customs or taxes) may occur when shipping to non-EU countries.

    Waiting For The Sun, The Doors’ third album and its first chart-topper, delivered the No. 1 signature smash “Hello, I Love You” and the Top 40 hit “The Unknown Soldier.” Slant Magazine proclaims that Waiting For The Sun contains some of The Doors’ prettiest, most genial lilts: “Love Street,” a fictionalized sketch of the Bohemian street where Morrison lived with his wife, Pamela Courson; the wistful “Summer’s Almost Gone,” which includes the lovely refrain, “Morning found us calmly unaware/Noon burned gold into our hair”; and the placid piano ballad “Yes, The River Knows.” More and more, says Slant, Morrison was starting to emulate one of his idols, Frank Sinatra — “after all, they had an insatiable taste for women and alcohol in common.” Waiting For The Sun was also some of The Doors’ most combative, political work. “The Unknown Soldier” was a barefaced antiwar attack, a reaction to the Vietnam-era hostilities brewing on the home front. Analogue Productions and Quality Record Pressings are proud to announce that six studio LP titles — The Doors, Strange DaysWaiting For The SunSoft ParadeMorrison Hotel and L.A. Woman —  are featured on 180-gram vinyl, pressed at 45 rpm. All six titles are also available on Multichannel SACD! All were cut from the original analog masters by Doug Sax, with the exception of The Doors, which was made from the best analog tape copy. A truly authentic reissue project, the masters were recorded on tube equipment, and the tape machine used for the transfer of these releases is a tube machine, as is the cutting system. Tubes baby! “Throughout the record history of the Doors, the goal between Paul Rothchild and myself was to be invisible, as the Doors were the songwriters and performers. Our duty was to capture them in the recorded medium without bringing attention to ourselves. Of course, the Doors were very successful, and Paul and I did receive some acclaim, which we did appreciate. “If you listen to all the Doors albums, no attempt was made to create sounds that weren’t generated by the Doors, except for the Moog Synthesizer on Strange Days, although that was played live in the mix by Jim, but that’s another story. The equipment used was very basic, mostly tube consoles and microphones. Telefunken U47, Sony C37A, Shure 56. The echo used was from real acoustic echo chambers and EMT plate reverb units. In those days, we didn’t have plug-ins or anything beyond an analogue eight-track machine. All the studios that we used, except for Elektra West, had three Altec Lansing 604E loudspeakers, as that was the standard in the industry, three-track. On EKS-74007, The Doors, we used four-track Ampex recorders and on the subsequent albums, 3M 56 eight-tracks. Dolby noise reduction units were used on two albums, Waiting For The Sun and The Soft Parade. Everything was analogue, digital was just a word. We didn’t use fuzz tone or other units like that but created the sounds organically, i.e. the massive dual guitar solo on “When The Music’s Over,” which was created by feeding the output of one microphone preamp into another and adjusting the level to create the distortion. The tubes were glowing and lit up the control room. “When mastering for the 45-RPM vinyl release, we were successfully able to bake the original master tapes and play them to cut the lacquer masters.” – Bruce Botnick, July 2012 “I received test pressings today for both Morrison Hotel and L.A. Woman. I have to tell you that these are the very best pressings I’ve heard in many, many moons. Great plating and your compound is so quiet that I clearly heard every fade out to its conclusion with no problem. Doug (Sax) and company did a lovely job, the tapes sound pretty damn good for being almost 50 years old and his system is clearly the best…You should be very proud of what you and your troops are doing.” – Bruce Botnick, The Doors producer/engineer Click here to read a 1997 interview in The Tracking Angle with Doors producer/engineer Bruce Botnick.

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  • In stock

    Joe Walsh – The Smoker You Drink, The Player You Get

    88,00 

    Includes 19% MwSt DE
    Additional costs (e.g. for customs or taxes) may occur when shipping to non-EU countries.

    True audiophile joy — now cut at 45 RPM 2LP for better tracking, exceptional bass! Remastered by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio from the original master tapes Plated and pressed on 180-gram vinyl at Quality Record Pressings! Stoughton Printing gatefold tip-on heavyweight cardboard jacket Praise for the 33 1/3 version of The Smoker You Drink, The Player You Get "(Side one) ends with the appropriately titled 'Happy Ways,' a Latin-tinged guitar-fest with lovely chunky bass lines that sounds absolutely glorious on this Analogue Productions pressing. The zing of steel string guitar almost sounds dead on the CD and tired on my ancient vinyl pressing, so this is clearly not one of those remasters that's based on an umpteenth generation copy of the tapes. ... You owe it to yourself to hear this album — and it will not sound any better than this spectacular pressing." — Recording = 8/10; Music 10/10 — Jason Kenedy, Hi-Fi+, Issue 148 "An outstanding new 180gm LP reissue from Analogue Productions, with improved sound thanks to a sparkling new remaster by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio, makes it clear that this 1973 release remains — with the possible exception of 1978's But Seriously, Folks . . . — the undisputed highlight of Walsh's solo career. ... Another week, another beautiful-sounding, wonderfully packaged reissue from Analogue Productions." Read the whole review here. — Robert Baird, Stereophile.com, May 2017 In between his stints with the James Gang and the Eagles, Joe Walsh tackled his second solo studio album The Smoker You Drink The Player You Get which became his most successful solo outing. The 1973 LP continued the heavy and light rock mix of tracks found on his previous release, Barnstorm. Analogue Productions has done reissue justice to the album that AllMusic decries "features some of the most remembered Joe Walsh tracks, but it's not just these that make the album a success. Each of the nine tracks is a song to be proud of. This is a superb album by anyone's standards." To obtain the best sound possible we turned to Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio to remaster this superb album from the original analog tapes. Next we plated the lacquers and pressed LPs on 180-gram audiophile vinyl at the world's best LP maker, Quality Record Pressings. Top it all off with a deluxe Stoughton Printing gatefold tip-on jacket and you've got the makings for audiophile joy. But would we stop there? Hardly. Now with our 45 RPM release, the best-sounding version of this rock music gem gives listeners an even richer sonic experience. The dead-quiet double-LP, with the music spread over four sides of vinyl, reduces distortion and high frequency loss as the wider-spaced grooves let your stereo cartridge track more accurately. This amazingly eclectic rock album has Joe's smash "Rocky Mountain Way," his hit "Meadows," plus "Bookends," "Wolf; Dreams" and more! Walsh's abililty to swing wildly from one end of the rock scale to the other is unparalleled and makes for an album to suit many tastes.

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  • In stock

    The Doors – Strange Days

    82,00 

    Includes 19% MwSt DE
    Additional costs (e.g. for customs or taxes) may occur when shipping to non-EU countries.

    "... This double 45 offers incredible dynamics, beautiful detail and just comes alive in my room. The drums are so dynamic and alive it is startling on some cuts. Morrison's voice is right there with all its power and gravel. It never breaks up, but simply sounds so right. ... To be honest, these are better than I ever dreamed rock music from the sixties could sound. I want to thank everyone at Analogue Productions for bringing me such sweet sounds from some of my favorite music ever. My highest recommendation!" — Jack Roberts, dagogo.com, September 2012 Sinister, beguiling ... these were words reviewers used to describe The Door’s melodic psychedelic-era genre-blending sound. A mix of blues, Eastern music, classical and pop fueled hits such as the bluesy “Love Me Two Times” and “People Are Strange” from The Door’s debut follow-up, Strange Days. Strange Days featured a smattering of edgy recitations (“Horse Latitudes”) and smoky rockers (“My Eyes Have Seen You”). Morrison’s rallying cry “We want the world, and we want it now!” from the ambitious extended track, “When the Music’s Over,” marked a touchstone for that era’s counterculture movement. Rolling Stone described Strange Days as having “all the power and energy of the first LP, but (it’s) more subtle, more intricate and much more effective.” Analogue Productions and Quality Record Pressings are proud to announce that these six studio LP titles — The Doors, Strange DaysWaiting For The SunSoft ParadeMorrison Hotel and L.A. Woman —  are featured on 180-gram vinyl, pressed at 45 rpm. All six titles are also available on Multichannel SACD! All were cut from the original analog masters by Doug Sax, with the exception of The Doors, which was made from the best analog tape copy. A truly authentic reissue project, the masters were recorded on tube equipment, and the tape machine used for the transfer of these releases is a tube machine, as is the cutting system. Tubes baby! "Throughout the record history of the Doors, the goal between Paul Rothchild and myself was to be invisible, as the Doors were the songwriters and performers. Our duty was to capture them in the recorded medium without bringing attention to ourselves. Of course, the Doors were very successful, and Paul and I did receive some acclaim, which we did appreciate. "If you listen to all the Doors albums, no attempt was made to create sounds that weren't generated by the Doors, except for the Moog Synthesizer on Strange Days, although that was played live in the mix by Jim, but that's another story. The equipment used was very basic, mostly tube consoles and microphones. Telefunken U47, Sony C37A, Shure 56. The echo used was from real acoustic echo chambers and EMT plate reverb units. In those days, we didn't have plug-ins or anything beyond an analogue eight-track machine. All the studios that we used, except for Elektra West, had three Altec Lansing 604E loudspeakers, as that was the standard in the industry, three-track. On EKS-74007, The Doors, we used four-track Ampex recorders and on the subsequent albums, 3M 56 eight-tracks. Dolby noise reduction units were used on two albums, Waiting For The Sun and The Soft Parade. Everything was analogue, digital was just a word. We didn't use fuzz tone or other units like that but created the sounds organically, i.e. the massive dual guitar solo on "When The Music's Over," which was created by feeding the output of one microphone preamp into another and adjusting the level to create the distortion. The tubes were glowing and lit up the control room. "When mastering for the 45-RPM vinyl release, we were successfully able to bake the original master tapes and play them to cut the lacquer masters." - Bruce Botnick, July 2012 "... Kassem has once again (as with the Impulse 45 RPM series) met the highest of expectations with these (album) covers. The 180 gram platters, housed in QRP rice paper sleeves, are equally impressive, arriving clean, flat and playing silently with nary a pop or tic throughout ... this dead quiet, ultra-dynamic pressing showcases the epic ("The End") bringing out low level detail that simply can't be heard on the already fantastic-sounding Monarch pressing original. ... Immediately upon dropping the needle on the Analogue Productions 45 RPM reissue of Strange Days, you know that you're about to experience something special. ... This 45 RPM pressing gives up none of the emotion or midrange complexity of the original and forces none of the overly tight bass sometimes heard on audiophile reissues in the process. ... This is as good as an audiophile reissue can get and I give it my highest recommendation." - My Vinyl Review "The double 45 (Strange Days) offers far greater dynamics, detail and uniformity among the tracks since the cut never extends near the high frequency curtailing inner groove area. ... It's the best sounding edition you will ever hear and well worth the price, especially if you had any idea what AP's Chad Kassem had to go through to convince the powers that be to let him use the original analog master tapes, and what he had to pay for the privilege." - Music = 10/11; Sound = 10/11 - Michael Fremer, Analog Planet, July 2012 Click here to read a 1997 interview in The Tracking Angle with Doors producer/engineer Bruce Botnick. "I received test pressings today for both Morrison Hotel and L.A. Woman. I have to tell you that these are the very best pressings I've heard in many, many moons. Great plating and your compound is so quiet that I clearly heard every fade out to its conclusion with no problem. Doug (Sax) and company did a lovely job, the tapes sound pretty damn good for being almost 50 years old and his system is clearly the best...You should be very proud of what you and your troops are doing." - Bruce Botnick, The Doors producer/engineer

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  • In stock

    The Doors – Morrison Hotel

    88,00 

    Includes 19% MwSt DE
    Additional costs (e.g. for customs or taxes) may occur when shipping to non-EU countries.

    "Throughout the record history of the Doors, the goal between Paul Rothchild and myself was to be invisible, as the Doors were the songwriters and performers. Our duty was to capture them in the recorded medium without bringing attention to ourselves. Of course, the Doors were very successful, and Paul and I did receive some acclaim, which we did appreciate. "If you listen to all the Doors albums, no attempt was made to create sounds that weren't generated by the Doors, except for the Moog Synthesizer on Strange Days, although that was played live in the mix by Jim, but that's another story. The equipment used was very basic, mostly tube consoles and microphones. Telefunken U47, Sony C37A, Shure 56. The echo used was from real acoustic echo chambers and EMT plate reverb units. In those days, we didn't have plug-ins or anything beyond an analogue eight-track machine. All the studios that we used, except for Elektra West, had three Altec Lansing 604E loudspeakers, as that was the standard in the industry, three-track. On EKS-74007, The Doors, we used four-track Ampex recorders and on the subsequent albums, 3M 56 eight-tracks. Dolby noise reduction units were used on two albums, Waiting For The Sun and The Soft Parade. Everything was analogue, digital was just a word. We didn't use fuzz tone or other units like that but created the sounds organically, i.e. the massive dual guitar solo on "When The Music's Over," which was created by feeding the output of one microphone preamp into another and adjusting the level to create the distortion. The tubes were glowing and lit up the control room. "When mastering for the 45-RPM vinyl release, we were successfully able to bake the original master tapes and play them to cut the lacquer masters." - Bruce Botnick, July 2012 "I received test pressings today for both Morrison Hotel and L.A. Woman. I have to tell you that these are the very best pressings I've heard in many, many moons. Great plating and your compound is so quiet that I clearly heard every fade out to its conclusion with no problem. Doug (Sax) and company did a lovely job, the tapes sound pretty damn good for being almost 50 years old and his system is clearly the best...You should be very proud of what you and your troops are doing." - Bruce Botnick, The Doors producer/engineer Click here to read a 1997 interview in The Tracking Angle with Doors producer/engineer Bruce Botnick.

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  • In stock

    The Doors – The Doors

    88,00 

    Includes 19% MwSt DE
    Additional costs (e.g. for customs or taxes) may occur when shipping to non-EU countries.

    "... To be honest, these are better than I ever dreamed rock music from the sixties could sound. I want to thank everyone at Analogue Productions for bringing me such sweet sounds from some of my favorite music ever. My highest recommendation!" — Jack Roberts, dagogo.com, September 2012 One of rock music’s most famous debuts, The Doors self-titled 1967 smash is legend. And now it becomes the kick-off for a positively stunning reissue series from Analogue Productions and Quality Record Pressings! The Doors was born after Jim Morrison and Ray Manzarek — who'd met at UCLA's film school — met again, unexpectedly, on the beach in Venice, CA, during the summer of 1965. Although he'd never intended to be a singer, Morrison was invited to join Manzarek's group Rick and the Ravens on the strength of his poetry. The group later changed its moniker, taking their name from Aldous Huxley's psychotropic monograph "The Doors of Perception." The band signed to Elektra Records following a now-legendary gig at the Whisky-a-Go-Go on the Sunset Strip. The Doors' arrival on the rock scene produced a string of hit singles and albums destined to become clasics. Belting out a standard like “Back Door Man” or talk-singing such originals as “The Crystal Ship,” and “I Looked at You,” one reviewer wrote that leather-clad frontman Morrison exuded “both sensuality and menace.” The Doors reached Billboard’s No. 2 slot and delivered the No. 1 signature smash “Light My Fire” plus “Break On Through,” “The Crystal Ship,” and “The End.” Analogue Productions and Quality Record Pressings are proud to announce that these six studio LP titles — The Doors, Strange DaysWaiting For The SunSoft ParadeMorrison Hotel and L.A. Woman —  are featured on 180-gram vinyl, pressed at 45 rpm. All six are also available on Multichannel SACD! All were cut from the original analog masters by Doug Sax, with the exception of The Doors, which was made from the best analog tape copy. "Throughout the record history of the Doors, the goal between Paul Rothchild and myself was to be invisible, as the Doors were the songwriters and performers. Our duty was to capture them in the recorded medium without bringing attention to ourselves. Of course, the Doors were very successful, and Paul and I did receive some acclaim, which we did appreciate. "If you listen to all the Doors albums, no attempt was made to create sounds that weren't generated by the Doors, except for the Moog Synthesizer on Strange Days, although that was played live in the mix by Jim, but that's another story. The equipment used was very basic, mostly tube consoles and microphones. Telefunken U47, Sony C37A, Shure 56. The echo used was from real acoustic echo chambers and EMT plate reverb units. In those days, we didn't have plug-ins or anything beyond an analogue eight-track machine. All the studios that we used, except for Elektra West, had three Altec Lansing 604E loudspeakers, as that was the standard in the industry, three-track. On EKS-74007, The Doors, we used four-track Ampex recorders and on the subsequent albums, 3M 56 eight-tracks. Dolby noise reduction units were used on two albums, Waiting For The Sun and The Soft Parade. Everything was analogue, digital was just a word. We didn't use fuzz tone or other units like that but created the sounds organically, i.e. the massive dual guitar solo on "When The Music's Over," which was created by feeding the output of one microphone preamp into another and adjusting the level to create the distortion. The tubes were glowing and lit up the control room. "When mastering for the 45-RPM vinyl release, we were successfully able to bake the original master tapes and play them to cut the lacquer masters." - Bruce Botnick, July 2012 "...the amount of detail and space produced here is superior to any version of this that I've heard save for the Elektra original, which is serious competition though good luck finding a clean quiet one. Even then the 45rpm cut's spaciousness, dynamics and bass power and particularly the overall sound on what are the inner tracks on the original LP are better on the double 45 cut using an all vacuum tube chain just as was the original...The double 45 has greater dynamics, detail, spaciousness and appropriate grit - everything the smooooth 192k/24 bit sourced version lacks...Definitely on my recommended list and the Quality Record Pressings vinyl is superb." Music = 9/11; Sound = 9/11 - Michael Fremer, Analog Planet, July 2012 To read Fremer's full review click here Click here to read a 1997 interview in The Tracking Angle with Doors producer/engineer Bruce Botnick. "... Kassem has once again (as with the Impulse 45 RPM series) met the highest of expectations with these (album) covers. The 180 gram platters, housed in QRP rice paper sleeves, are equally impressive, arriving clean, flat and playing silently with nary a pop or tic throughout ... this dead quiet, ultra-dynamic pressing showcases the epic ("The End") bringing out low level detail that simply can't be heard on the already fantastic-sounding Monarch pressing original. ... Immediately upon dropping the needle on the Analogue Productions 45 RPM reissue of Strange Days, you know that you're about to experience something special. ... This 45 RPM pressing gives up none of the emotion or midrange complexity of the original and forces none of the overly tight bass sometimes heard on audiophile reissues in the process. ... This is as good as an audiophile reissue can get and I give it my highest recommendation." — My Vinyl Review "I received test pressings today for both Morrison Hotel and L.A. Woman. I have to tell you that these are the very best pressings I've heard in many, many moons. Great plating and your compound is so quiet that I clearly heard every fade out to its conclusion with no problem. Doug (Sax) and company did a lovely job, the tapes sound pretty damn good for being almost 50 years old and his system is clearly the best...You should be very proud of what you and your troops are doing." - Bruce Botnick, The Doors producer/engineer

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    Herbie Hancock – Head Hunters

    88,00 

    Includes 19% MwSt DE
    Additional costs (e.g. for customs or taxes) may occur when shipping to non-EU countries.

    "Listening to the opening track 'Chameleon' on any release will get you feeling funky, but the Analogue Productions 2LP 45rpm release will get you groovin'! ... Analogue Productions does an incredible job on this release, keeping you enveloped in the music while breaking down the barrier between your stereo and musicians. I'd previously had a run-of-the-mill reissue of this album that I thought was good and did the job, but because of how much I love this album I opted to spend some more bucks on the AP release, not expecting a huge difference. Boy was I wrong. There is so much more clarity to every instrument, and instead of the funk taking a backseat, it punches you in the face and demands your attention. Both of my discs arrived flat and without any pressing defects or jacket damage on the mighty journey from Salina to Edmonton. I would urge any record collector to buy this release." — Music = 10/11; Sound = 10/11 — Simon Guile, AnalogPlanet.com. To read Guile's full review, click here. There are few artists in the music industry who have had more influence on acoustic and electronic jazz and R&B than Herbie Hancock. In 1963, Miles Davis invited Hancock to join the Miles Davis Quintet. During his five years with Davis, Herbie recorded many classics with the jazz legend including ESPNefertiti and Sorcerer, and later on he made appearances on Davis' groundbreaking In a Silent Way and Bitches Brew. Hancock's own solo career blossomed on Blue Note, with classic albums including Maiden VoyageEmpyrean Isles and Speak Like a Child. After leaving Davis' fold, Herbie put together a new band called The Headhunters and, in 1973 in San Francisco, recorded Head Hunters. Head Hunters became not only Hancock's best-selling album, but also the second highest selling jazz album of all time (at last RIAA count). It was in 1973 that he gathered a new band to combine electric music with funk, perhaps best exemplified in the pop music of Sly Stone. Hancock took over all synthesizer duties, along with Fender Rhodes and clavinet and was backed by bass and drums. The opening bars of "Watermelon Man" with Bill Summers blowing into a beer bottle, along with the band's funky grooves and new electric sounds, captured the crossover fans who had otherwise avoided buying jazz records. Head Hunters was a pivotal point in Hancock's career, bringing him into the vanguard of jazz fusion. Hancock had pushed avant-garde boundaries on his own albums and with Miles Davis, but he had never devoted himself to the groove as he did on Head Hunters. Drawing heavily from Sly Stone, Curtis Mayfield and James Brown, Hancock developed deeply funky, even gritty, rhythms over which he soloed on electric synthesizers, bringing the instrument to the forefront in jazz. It had all of the sensibilities of jazz, particularly in the way it wound off into long improvisations, but its rhythms were firmly planted in funk, soul and R&B, giving it a mass appeal that made it the biggest-selling jazz album of all time (a record which was later broken). Jazz purists, of course, decried the experiments at the time, but Head Hunters still sounds fresh and vital four decades after its initial release, and its genre-bending proved vastly influential on not only jazz, but funk, soul and hip-hop.

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    Julie London – Latin In A Satin Mood

    88,00 

    Includes 19% MwSt DE
    Additional costs (e.g. for customs or taxes) may occur when shipping to non-EU countries.

    She was the sultry film starlet-turned-torch singer-come-TV actress whose dusky alto captivated a generation. Julie London was "discovered" while running a department store elevator in Hollywood. Just three years earlier the bountiful 15 year old, born Julie Peck to her parents, a song-and-dance duo of the vaudeville era, was singing on her parents' radio show. When she started working in the movies in the 1940s, she changed her name to London. During the course of a celebrated career in acting and music, she made more than 30 albums. The sultry-voiced actress, who was once married to "Dragnet" producer-star Jack Webb, had a hit record with the 1950s single "Cry Me a River." The single debuted in 1955, sold three million copies and remained in demand into the 1960s. Analogue Productions has brought back Julie London sings Latin In A Satin Mood in dramatic, deserving fashion. Remastered by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio, and plated and pressed on 200-gram vinyl at Quality Record Pressings, the crispness and vibrancy of this recording is spectacular. And we've cut this version at 45 RPM, meaning the 12 tracks are spread over two LPs for even better cartridge tracking for superior sound quality! Exotic and Latin albums were big deals in the 1950s and early '60s, and singers as diverse as Dean Martin, Lena Horne, and Peggy Lee were recording with castanets and bongo drums. Like Peggy Lee, London combines a restrained vocal approach with jazz phrasing and a cool attitude with icy sex appeal on this album of relaxing Latin standards. Julie does look beautiful on the cover, and the back up male "mariachi-esque" serenade ads to the romantic ambiance. Speaking of the cover, expect only top-notch reproduction for our Analogue Productions reissue. Originally a single LP jacket, we've upgraded to a gatefold incorporating more original photographs provided by Universal. London appeared in nearly two dozen motion pictures during the 1940s and '50s; she was best known to TV audiences as nurse Dixie McCall on the 1970s hospital drama "Emergency!" She was hired on "Emergency!" by Webb," her then-former spouse, to co-star with her second husband, jazz musician Bobby Troup. Troup, who composed the iconic musical hit "Route 66" played a doctor on the show and it was he who helped sign Julie to the Liberty record label. Describing her smoky vocal style, London once said, "It's only a thimbleful of a voice, and I have to use it close to a microphone. But it is a kind of over-smoked voice, and it automatically sounds intimate." A style inimitable, in our estimation.

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    Nat ‘King’ Cole – After Midnight

    108,00 

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    "...the originals are a distant second to these 45rpm LPs. Cole's voice is up front, and the accompaniment, especially the massed strings, has a colorful vividness. After Midnight was recorded in mono, and it is among the very best 1.0-channel reissues. Played with a mono cartridge, it displays intimacy and tonal purity that must be heard to be believed. Recordings this revealing offer new ways of evaluating everything about the recording sessions, and both sets hold up under the scrutiny...All of Analogue Productions' Nat 'King' Cole releases go the extra mile..." — Marc Mickelson, The Audio Beat, September 5, 2010 "...the Nat King Cole LPs are astonishingly beautiful, particularly played through my new Wilson Maxx3's. They make me cry." — Max Paley, Acoustic Sounds customer In this felicitous blending of Nat "King" Cole's supreme talents as jazz pianist and vocalist with small combos featuring fellow jazz alumni, classic pop and jazz met in a wildly successful brew. A combination of new and familiar songs are featured, including fresh recordings of classic hits like "Route 66." Musicians include Harry "Sweets" Edison, Juan Tizol, Lee Young, Stuff Smith and Willie Smith augmenting his famous Trio. In addition to the full original album, five additional tracks and one alternate take from the original sessions are included in this release. Mellow, classy, focused and vibrant, After Midnight was a hit and an instant classic upon its release in 1956 and remains a gem to treasure today. Mastered fully analogue from the original first-generation full-track monaural session tapes by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray to 45-RPM 180-gram vinyl, the exemplary recording is presented in appropriately exquisite sound quality. Recorded in 1956.

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    Nat ‘King’ Cole – Just One of Those Things

    88,00 

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    "...in terms of sound, the originals are a distant second to these 45rpm LPs. Cole's voice is up front, and the accompaniment, especially the massed strings, has a colorful vividness." - Marc Mickelson, The Audio Beat, September 2010 Analogue Productions' Blue Note and Nat "King" Cole Reissues WIN A Positive Feedback 2010 Brutus Award! "...if you haven't picked up every one of the Blue Note and Nat King Cole reissues from Chad Kassem and company at Acoustic Sounds, you're really missing out!" - David W. Robinson, Positive Feedback, Issue 52 "...the originals are a distant second to these 45rpm LPs. Cole's voice is up front, and the accompaniment, especially the massed strings, has a colorful vividness...Recordings this revealing offer new ways of evaluating everything about the recording sessions, and both sets hold up under the scrutiny...All of Analogue Productions' Nat 'King' Cole releases go the extra mile. They come with well-done booklets that discuss in detail each album's history and the remastering wizardry responsible for their sonics." - Marc Mickelson, The Audio Beat, September 5, 2010 "...the Nat King Cole LPs are astonishingly beautiful, particularly played through my new Wilson Maxx3's. They make me cry." - Max Paley, Acoustic Sounds customer Contrasting downbeat ballads with an ironic brassy, upbeat big band attitude, the ironic Cole Porter standard Just One Of Those Things sets the tone for a distinctive, pungent experience of love and disillusionment with a swing. Brilliantly backing the intimately expressive and supremely musical voice of the incomparable Nat "King" Cole, a big band with no "strings" smolders, swings, saunters, storms, sighs and sizzles with the arrangements of the distinctive Billy May. Featuring top shelf interpretations of "These Foolish Things," "Who's Sorry Now?" "The Party's Over" and more, this album is among its era's finest recordings of popular music and its quality, style and spirit remains unexcelled. Using the original 3-track session tapes from Capitol's vaults and all-analogue systems including custom headstacks, 3-track preview heads, console and monitoring chain installed at AcousTech specially for these releases, mastering engineers Kevin Gray and Steve Hoffman realize the stunning beauty of these recordings. A superb track recorded for the album, "You'll Never Know," which was omitted due to space constraints, is included in this double 45-RPM 180-gram album set. Included with this deluxe reissue is a striking four-panel booklet complete with rare photos, a 2,200-word essay by Jordan Taylor on the album and a 1,200-word essay by Michael Fremer about the remastering process. This truly is a no-expenses-spared project, resulting in the ultimate version of this title and a historic reissue. Originally released in 1957.

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    Nat ‘King’ Cole – St. Louis Blues

    88,00 

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    "...if you haven't picked up every one of the Blue Note and Nat King Cole reissues from Chad Kassem and company at Acoustic Sounds, you're really missing out!" - David W. Robinson, Positive Feedback, Issue 52 "...the Nat King Cole LPs are astonishingly beautiful, particularly played through my new Wilson Maxx3's. They make me cry." - Max Paley, Acoustic Sounds customer An influential figure in the early 20th century development of blues and popular music as a music scholar and as the composer of numerous popular songs, W.C. Handy has often been called "the Father of the Blues." When two of the finest and most popular of mid-20th century musical figures, jazz and popular music icon Nat "King" Cole and style setting arranger extraordinare Nelson Riddle undertook an album dedicated to the music of W.C. Handy, the results were at once a worthy tribute and transformative. Particularly smooth vocals by Nat "King" Cole were aptly backed by resourceful orchestrations from Nelson Riddle. From the landmark laments of "St. Louis Blues" and the loving appreciation of "Morning Star" on through to the colloquial rag of "Joe Turner's Blues," the varied facets of W.C. Handy's songs were given a lastingly freshened interpretation. Along with the contemporary Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy (also available here at Acoustic Sounds), this album is considered by many to be the best anthology of the music of W.C. Handy. Using the original first generation 3-track session tapes from Capitol's vaults and all-analogue systems including custom headstacks, 3-track preview heads, console and monitoring chain installed at AcousTech specially for these releases, mastering engineers Kevin Gray and Steve Hoffman realize the rich beauty of these recordings in this double 45-RPM 180-gram album set. Included with this deluxe reissue is a striking six-panel booklet complete with rare photos, a 1,600-word essay by Jordan Taylor on the album and a 1,200-word essay by Michael Fremer about the remastering process. This truly is a no-expenses-spared project, resulting in the ultimate version of this title and a historic reissue. Originally released in 1958.

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    Nat ‘King’ Cole – The Very Thought of You

    88,00 

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    "...if you haven't picked up every one of the Blue Note and Nat King Cole reissues from Chad Kassem and company at Acoustic Sounds, you're really missing out!" - David W. Robinson, Positive Feedback, Issue 52 "...the Nat King Cole LPs are astonishingly beautiful, particularly played through my new Wilson Maxx3's. They make me cry." - Max Paley, Acoustic Sounds customer Nat "King" Cole and arranger Gordon Jenkins followed their hit album Love Is The Thing with The Very Thought Of You, foraging further into romantic and sensual bliss and creating the audio equivalent of a distillation of romantic ardor in a bottle. The sixteen ballads of The Very Thought Of You, each with their own euphoric tinge, include the title track "The Very Thought of You," "For All We Know," "Paradise," and "But Beautiful." Again orchestrated with the heavenly strings of the distinctive Gordon Jenkins, sympathetically backing the intimately expressive and supremely musical voice of the incomparable Nat "King" Cole, the result again stands among its era's finest, most stylistically defining recordings of popular music and continues to enchant listeners to this day. Using the original 3-track session tapes from Capitol's vaults and all-analogue systems including custom headstacks, 3-track preview heads, console and monitoring chain installed at AcousTech specially for these releases, mastering engineers Kevin Gray and Steve Hoffman realize the stunning wide-range potential and beauty of these recordings. Original releases contained 14 tracks, omitting two superb tracks recorded for the album, "Don't Blame Me" and "There Is No Greater Love," due to space constraints, but the full 16 tracks are included in this double 45-RPM 180-gram album set.

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    Elvis Presley – Stereo ’57 (Essential Elvis Volume 2)

    88,00 

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    The discovery of these 2-track masters comprising Stereo ‘57 - The Essential Elvis Volume 2, is nothing short of a miracle, and this 200-gram pressing cut at 45 RPM from Quality Record Pressings sounds so astonishing, your jaw will hit the floor! From the moment Elvis began working with a new song, sound engineer Thorne Norgar had the 15 ips mono tape machine rolling simultaneously with a 2-track protection copy. The machines weren't switched to pause until Elvis was satisfied with the take. A couple of years before the advent of the stereo LP in mid-1958, major record companies were experimenting with stereophonic recordings, often refered to then as binaural. Studios were using the new Ampex 2-track tape recorders for other purposes, such as for recording session back-ups. But few Elvis fans know how close history came to permanently losing these precious audio glimpses of a young Elvis engrossed in the creative process. Founded in 1933, Radio Recorders of Los Angeles was the preeminent recording studio of its day, and its director of recording, long-time engineer Thorne Nogar, engineered all of the Elvis sessions from 1955 to 1961. Some of popular music's greatest hits: "Jailhouse Rock," "All Shook Up," "Loving You," and "Teddy Bear," are just a few of the blockbusters that Nogar oversaw Elvis record at the studios, located at 7000 Santa Monica Blvd. Elvis would be right in the center of everything, at every recording session, Nogar would later recall. "Like with the Jordanaires when he sang, we would set it up with a unidirectional mike, so he would be standing right in front of them, facing them, and they would have their own directional microphone and they would be singing to one another." The 2-tracks from which this record was pressed could not have sounded better, and there was no one more careful, more experienced and technically skilled to record these historic sessions than Nogar, says Acoustic Sounds' founder and CEO Chad Kassem. Yet one day years later when Thorne was "cleaning out" his tapes closet, remarkably, he set these 2-track backup tapes aside, intending to dispose of them. Noted producer Bones Howe had worked for Nogar as a tape operator at Radio Recorders, and thanks to him the tapes were saved from a final resting place in the trash can. Bones took the tapes home with him. He'd put them safely away in a bank vault. These 2-tracks have "erase" clearly written on the master log sheets. They're from January 1957 sessions at which Presley produced material for two EPs and the film "Loving You" soundtrack. They're the only known ones surviving from the pre-stereo era. RCA's Essential Elvis series was a vehicle for the release of Presley's alternate takes. On this double LP set, listeners hear Presley at work, refining band arrangements and working through the nuances of his vocal performance. The LP reveals the Jordanaires voices' sparkling with a natural lifelike sound that's both sonically rich and detailed. The Jordanaires, a vocal quartet originally formed as a gospel group in 1948, gained fame largely for being Elvis' background singers, both in live appearances and recordings, from 1956 to 1972. If discovering these rare, almost lost recorded treasures weren't enough, the sound reproduction puts this release over the top! When the Jordanaires sing "Peace in the Valley," you'll swear you're hearing a melody sent from heaven. An audiophile's prayer come true! There are a number of first and second takes, during which Presley and his backing musicians make tentative passes at the material. As the record progresses, arrangements take shape and Presley, growing more confident that a keeper take is imminent, sings with more enthusiasm. Throughout, Presley is heard directing the proceedings and demonstrating a lot of "aw shucks" charm in the process, goofing with band members and laughing through his and others', flubs. Like other reissues pressed by QRP, this magnificent 200-gram LP is notable for its absolutely silent background. The vocal harmonies are tingle-inducing, life-sized and utterly natural. For serious Elvis fans and anyone else interested in the creative process, Volume 2 meets the first definition of "essential" as well as the second: it's indispensable stuff.

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    Stevie Ray Vaughan – In Step

    88,00 

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    With his astonishingly accomplished guitar playing, Stevie Ray Vaughan ignited the blues revival of the '80s. Vaughan drew equally from bluesmen like Albert King, Otis Rush and Hubert Sumlin and rock 'n' roll players like Jimi Hendrix and Lonnie Mack, as well as the stray jazz guitarist like Kenny Burrell, developing a uniquely eclectic and fiery style that sounded like no other guitarist, regardless of genre. On 1989's In Step, Vaughan found his own songwriting voice, blending blues, soul, and rock in unique ways, and writing with startling emotional honesty. Yes, there are a few covers, all well chosen, but the heart of the album rests in the songs he co-wrote with Doyle Bramhall, the man who penned the Soul to Soul highlight "Change It." Fueled by a desire to make up for lost time and delight in his reawakened commitment to life and sobriety, Vaughan turned in what many consider his greatest artistic statement, an album ensconced in sweat, soul, determination, and not an ounce of filler. "Travis Walk" offers a heady rush of flat-picking, "The House is Rockin'" is full-tilt roots-boogie, "Let Me Love You Baby" and "Leave My Girl Alone" are sweet blues epiphanies, and the nine-minute instrumental "Riviera Paradise" is a truly soulful mix of blues and jazz. By now, just a year before his untimely death, Vaughan had also tamed his bawling voice into a rich instrument. In short, this 1989 session is Vaughan at his artistic peak. As we did with our vaunted box set reissues, Texas Hurricane, again Analogue Productions is bringing you the finest-sounding Stevie Ray Vaughan collections ever preserved on 180-gram vinyl. Ryan Smith at Sterling Sound cut the lacquers for the LPs using the ultimate VMS 80 cutting lathe. Gary Salstrom handled the plating and the vinyl was pressed of course at Quality Record Pressings. In Step remains one of the five greatest blues records of the past quarter century. There's not a link in this chain that wasn't absolute first-rate. The absolute best that money can buy. We're passionate about the blues AND Stevie Ray and the passion shows up here in spades.

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    Stevie Ray Vaughan – Texas Flood

    88,00 

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    The 45 RPM Analogue Productions reissue of Stevie Ray Vaughan's Texas Flood is so good, as are its 45 RPM companions — Couldn't Stand The Weather and Soul To Soul — that they truly represent what Gregg Geller, producer and A&R representative described as "the best replication of the master tapes to date." We've already brought you the 33 1/3 RPM box set Texas Hurricane featuring the greatest Stevie Ray Vaughan tribute ever reissued — six of Vaughan's most classic album titles remastered for ultimate blues and guitar fanatics. We've now taken the extra step and done 45 RPM versions of these three standout LPs. We've used the original 30 inches-per-second, half-inch analog master tapes for all of these albums. Ryan K. Smith at Sterling Sound cut the lacquers for the LPs using the ultimate VMS 80 cutting lathe. Gary Salstrom handled the plating and the vinyl was pressed of course at our Quality Record Pressings, maker of the world's finest-sounding LPs.  Stevie Ray Vaughan's 1983 debut album, Texas Flood, was a phenomenal success, climbing into the Top 40 and spending over half a year on the charts, which was practically unheard of for a blues recording. The record plays like a dynamite club show, filled with crowd-pleasing originals and covers, all performed with unbridled enthusiasm. Texas Flood was certified gold on August 13, 1990, and certified platinum on January 22, 1992. There's not a link in this production chain that wasn't absolute first-rate. The absolute best that money can buy. But beyond that we've poured our passion into this project. Acoustic Sounds is a big fan of the blues and Stevie Ray Vaughan. It's a big dream come true to work on this project and to make these records sound and look the best they ever have.

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    Duke Ellington – Masterpieces By Ellington (Mono)

    88,00 

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    "...while the 33 was a startler, the new (45 RPM) version — spread out on two LPs, to accommodate the wider grooves — will leave you breathless. There's more sparkle to Ellington's piano, more wood in Wendell Marshall's bass, more breath and reed and romance in Johnny Hodges' alto sax, more force in Jimmy Hamilton's hard-blown clarinet. Each player in the horn sections sounds more distinct; I hear more of Duke's playing, underneath those sections, too. And soloists — palpable enough in 33 1/3 RPM — are holographic at 45. In short, the 45 lets us hear more of the music, more of the detail, more of the human presence; it transports us more completely back in time." — Fred Kaplan, Stereophile.com, June 17, 2017. Read the whole review here. Praise for our 33 1/3 version! Named a 2015 Record To Die For by Stereophile magazine. http://www.stereophile.com/content/2015-records-die-page-3 "Remastered by Ryan Smith at Sterling Sound from the original analog tapes, the record was plated and pressed at Quality Record Pressings. The depth and space when those rich chromatic harmonies create a wide and well-defined soundscape, the timbre of the orchestra as a whole as well as individual instruments, and the thick, wooden sound of Wendell Marshall's bass are among the aural pleasures provided when you drop a needle on this platter; expect goose bumps." — Music = 5/5; Sonics = 4.5/5 - Jeff Wilson, The Absolute Sound, May-June 2015. "I chose the CD reissue of this album as one of my R2D4s for 2012, but now from Chad Kassem's Analogue Productions comes this QRP LP, and it's an occasion for popping corks. Released in 1950, this was Ellington's first LP, and he used the new medium to stretch out four of his biggest hits. The arrangements are jaw-droppingly gorgeous and the sound just slightly less so. Recorded by Fred Plaut, who later miked Kind of Blue and other Columbia classics, it has the dynamics, depth, and in-your-face tonal realism of a modern (mono) audiophile thumper. Among the best jazz albums ever. How about a 45rpm pressing, Chad?" — Fred Kaplan, for Stereophile - "Records To Die For" - February 2015. "Among the first recordings arranged and produced to take advantage of the LP's longer playing time, this album was released in 1950 on Columbia Records' classical imprint, Masterworks, with a whimsical cover by Stan Fraydas (author of Hoppy, the Curious Kangaroo) that's reproduced for this edition. (Columbia soon replaced it with an image more "modern" and more mundane.)... Freed from the 78rpm single's three-minute constraint, Ellington could score and record concert-length arrangements similar to those enjoyed by his concert audiences. Three of the four selections, including 'Mood Indigo' and 'Sophisticated Lady,' are familiar Ellington classics stretched and elasticized to luxurious effect. The harmonically saturated, transparent mono sound is astonishing for any era of recording. It's sure to leave you swooning, and wondering how and why recorded sound has since gone so far south." — Michael Fremer, for Stereophile - "Records To Die For" - February 2015. "I have recently been obsessed with Masterpieces by Ellington, one of the best records I have ever heard in terms of music and production. I can now see Ellington in full technicolor glory!" — Colleen ‘Cosmo' Murphy, Classic Album Sundays "Chad Kassem's Analogue Productions, in conjunction with Ryan Smith of Sterling Sound mastering studio have produced an LP that equals and in some way exceeds the sound of a pristine original pressing properly equalized. The perfectly quiet vinyl and exemplary packaging add up to one of the best reissues of the century." Recording = 10/10; Music = 10/10 - Dennis D. Davis, Hi-Fi +, Issue 120 "This new re-issue slays my vintage copy in every way. Every dimension of the recording was much better...dynamics, harmonics, frequency response, detail, jump...all just leaped out at me! The recording sounded like it had been made that morning...absolutely fresh-sounding. No veiling. No roll-off. In fact, it's so good that it doesn't matter that this is a mono recording! Listen to it on a great turntable...you'll hear mono that fools you into thinking that it's not mono. Just wait until you hear Yvonne Lanauze sing, "Mood Indigo" amigos, after a long instrumental build-up...she'll take you there! ... The pressing itself was impeccable: flat, and free of noise, tics and pops...a genuine masterpiece of the pressing-plant arts. The Hyperion OCL, the finest cartridge that I've ever heard, revealed how superbly these grooves were carved! Commendable, reference-grade analog...very, very close to master tape sound. Very damned close! Kissing cousins close! Hell, maybe even closer than that. In fact, I now consider the Analogue Productions re-issue of Masterpieces by Ellington to be one of the very finest Jazz records ever released. (Sorry Miles! Move over, Kind of Blue!)." — David W. Robinson, editor-in-chief, Positive Feedback Online. "Most highly recommended (the record is now on the QRP presses). It's one of my 'Records to Die For' in the February 2015 Stereophile. You won't have to die to get a copy. $30 will do and it's well worth the money. A true classic both musically and sonically and a historical work of art you can now own." — Music = 11/11; Sound = 11/11 — Michael Fremer, AnalogPlanet.com. Read the whole review here. "The best album ever made by Duke Ellington, which is to say, one of the best albums in jazz — is also one of his least known. ... now, a leading audiophile record label, Analogue Productions of Salina, Kansas, has brought it out on pristine vinyl (it’s also, despite its vintage, one of the best-sounding jazz albums ever), and the time has come to take notice. ...  the new, remastered Analogue Productions LP, which is to the CD as a high-def television is to a circa-1980 Trinitron. Played on a good sound system, it’s a sonic time machine, hurling you into Columbia’s 30th Street Studio with the Ellington orchestra. Horns sound brassy, drums smack, cymbals sizzle, you hear the air pass through the woodwinds. When saxophones play in harmony, the overtones bloom like a sonic bouquet; when the musicians take a quarter-note pause, you hear them breathe in." — Fred Kaplan, Slate, Dec. 9, 2014 Read the whole review here. Masterpieces By Ellington shines from an astonishingly brief period of history that gave the recording industry two of its greatest achievements — the introduction of magnetic tape recording and the 33 1/3 LP, or long-playing record. Now with our 45 RPM release, the best-sounding version of this historic album gives listeners an even richer sonic experience. The dead-quiet double-LP, with the music spread over four sides of vinyl, reduces distortion and high frequency loss as the wider-spaced grooves let your stereo cartridge track more accurately. Four years. That's all it took to go from the discovery by Americans, of German advancements in the field of sound recording, to the marketing of tape decks in the U.S. by the Ampex company, to Columbia's unveiling of its 12” LP, and the first long-playing record to be sold to consumers. The four selections contained here catapulted the Maestro Ellington into the LP era, as the great composer/arranger/pianist and his matchless orchestra took full advantage of the possibilities afforded by magnetic tape recording and the still-new 33 1/3 RPM LP to, for the first time, capture uncut concert arrangements of their signature songs. Duke was joined for this album by a virtuoso supporting cast: Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn (piano). Russell ProcopePaul GonzalvesJohnnie HodgesJimmy Hamilton (saxophone). Nelson Williams, Andrew FordHarold BakerRay NanceWilliam Anderson (trumpet). Quentin JacksonLawrence Brown, Tyree Glenn (trombone). Mercer Ellington (horn). Sonny Greer (drums). Wendell Marshall (bass). Yvonne Lanauze (vocals). This album wouldn't have been possible without a chain of events starting at the end of World War II. Recorded in December 1950, just five years after Germany fell to the Allies, revealing the Germans' advances in magnetic tape recording, Ellington's master work holds its wonder still today and the recording quality hands-down betters the sound of many modern-day albums. 1944-45: Magnetic tape for sound recording spread to America after an American soldier, Jack Mullin, serving with the U.S. Army Signal Corps in the final months of WW II, received two suitcased-sized AEG 'Magnetophon' high-fidelity recorders and 50 reels of Farben recording tape that had fallen into American hands via the capture of a German radio station at Bad Nauheim. German engineers had perfected the technique of using Alternating Current bias — the addition of an inaudible high-fequency signal (from 40 to 150kHz) — to improve the sound quality of most audio recordings by reducing distortion and noise. 1947: Mullin became an American pioneer in the field of magnetic tape sound recording, after working to modify and improve the machines. He gave two demonstrations of the recorders at Radio Center in Hollywood in October 1947. A later demonstration for singer/entertainer Bing Crosby led to the use of magnetic tape for recording Crosby's radio programs. Crosby became the first star to use tape to pre-record radio broadcasts. 1948: Crosby invested $50,000 in local electronics firm, Ampex, and the tiny six-man concern soon became the world leader in the development of tape recording. Ampex revolutionized the radio and recording industry with its famous Model 200 tape deck, developed directly from Mullin's modified Magnetophones. Units marked serial No. 1 and 2 were delivered in April 1948 in time to record and edit the 27th Bing Crosby show of the 1947-48 season. A 200A at the time retailed for $4,000 — nearly as much as a standard single-family home. Crosby gave one of the first production tape decks to musician Les Paul, which led to Paul's invention of multitrack recording. The first production model 200A recorders are delivered to ABC and placed in service across the country. This marked the first widespread professional use of magnetic tape recording. Working with Mullin, Ampex rapidly developed 2-track stereo and then 3-track recorders. Mullin and Ampex developed a working monochrome videotape recorder by 1956. Here's where it gets really interesting, as The Duke and history made matchless audiophile magic. In 1950, two years into the LP era and the transition from disc to magnetic tape recording, Columbia Records got Duke Ellington and his orchestra into the studio to cut a long-playing record. The Columbia 30th Street Studio opened in 1949 and Masterpieces was one of the first recordings done in the studio! June 1948: Vinyl LPs had taken over as the standard for pressing records by the 1940s; in 1948 Columbia Records introduced its 12-inch Microgroove LP or Long Play record, which could hold at least 20 minutes per side. The first classical long-playing record, and the first 12" LP of any kind— catalog no. Columbia Masterworks Set ML 4001— was Mendelssohn's Concerto in E Minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64, played by violinist Nathan Milstein with the Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of New York, conducted by Bruno Walter. December 19, 1950. Masterpieces by Ellington recorded at Columbia's 30th Street Studio. Released in 1951. Recording engineers Fred Plaut and Harold Chapman. Recorded on an Ampex 200, using 3M-111 magnetic tape running at 15 inches per second. (3M-111 tape was also introduced in 1948, the year the Model 200 debuted). The Columbia 30th Street Studio (CBS 30th Street Studio) nicknamed "The Church" was considered by some to be the best-sounding room in its time and others consider it to have been the greatest recording studio in history. Numerous recordings were made there in all genres, including Miles Davis' Kind of Blue (1959), Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story (Original Cast recording, 1957), Percy Faith's Theme from a Summer Place (1960) and Pink Floyd's The Wall (1979). The facility included both Columbia's "Studio C" and "Studio D." See historical photos from the heyday of the Columbia 30th Street Studio here. Columbia Records transformed the former church (the Adams-Parkhurst Memorial Presbyterian Church, dedicated in 1875) into a recording studio in 1949. The studio had 100-foot high ceilings, a 100-foot floorspace to record, and the control room was on the second floor — a tight fit at 8x14 feet. It was later moved to the ground floor. Suddenly, for the first time in his career, Ellington was able to forgo the 3 minutes-and-change restrictions afforded by the short running time of the 78 RPM disc. He and his band rose to the occasion with extended (11-minute plus) 'uncut concert arrangements' of three of his signature songs — “Mood Indigo,” “Sophisticated Lady,” with evocative vocals by Yvonne Lanauze, as well as “Solitude.” Masterpieces was also notable for the debut of the full-bodied, surprise-laden “The Tattooed Bride,” and for the swansongs of three Ellintonian giants of longstanding: drummer Sonny Greer, trombonist Lawrence Brown and alto saxist Johnny Hodges (the latter two would eventually return to the fold). Masterpieces is a revelation and a throwback to a golden recording age. So much history and so much luck combined make this album truly special. "Even in this august company, 'The Tattooed Bride' is a swinging virtuoso piece that, as everyone present must have known, couldn't possibly have been captured in this manner in any era before this session — this was also one of the last sessions to feature the classic Ellington lineup with Johnny Hodges, Lawrence Brown, and Sonny Greer, before their exodus altered the band's sound, and so it's a doubly precious piece (as is the whole album), among the last written specifically for this lineup." — AllMusic.com

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